2014 Volt optional charging

Discussion in 'Volt' started by Francisco, Nov 18, 2017.

  1. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Greetings:
    Just purchased a 2014 Volt with 11,800 miles. Would want to charge a bit faster then overnight. Question: Are. all charge cords the same where plugs into car? Would want to charge at home during day between use. Recommendation on low cost purchase. Thanks. Bueno Bye. Francisco
     
  2. Francisco

    Francisco Member

     
  3. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Note to self. "You know nothing (Jon Snow)"
     
  4. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    Hi, Francisco.
    All charge cords are not the same. If you are just using a typical 110 V outlet, it's important to use a cord that a relatively heavy gauge and as short as is convenient. These factors keep resistance and subsequent heat down.

    If you want to charge faster, you need a home charging station (or EVSE ---electric vehicle electric vehicle supply equipment, as it's sometimes called) installed by an electrician. Where a 110 V outlet will only put out around 1.3 kW, an EVSE hooked up to a 240 V circuit will give you as much as your Volt's onboard charger can handle (3.3 kW). With an EVSE, it should charge empty to full in about 4 hours.
     
  5. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Thanks Domenick. I have seen several online, but still don't know if the connection plugin is the same for all brand cars and connectors. Hopefully I've phrased this correctly. Should I shy away from the lower priced ones or are they all the same? Thanks. Buen. Bye. Francisco..
     
  6. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    The connector that goes with a 240V EVSE home charging station is referred to as the SAE J1772. It's pretty much standard on every electric vehicle that isn't a Tesla, and is the one designed to be used in your Volt. You'll also find this connector at charging stations in public places, like the parking lots in many Whole Foods locations, for example.
    Here's a picture (hope this helps):
    sae-j1772c.jpg
     
  7. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Dmenic: Does cost equate quality?
     
  8. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    Sorry so slow to respond. Typically that is the case, but in the EV home charging area, there can be wide price fluctuations that aren't indicative of disparities in quality. Or, in plainer English, you should be able to get decent equipment despite paying a lot less than some people are asking.

    Perhaps someone can give a good source for cheap EVSE for your home. Are you located in the US?
     
  9. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Greetings:
    Hope that everyone enjoyed time with family and friends over the weekend.
    Yes, I live in Taos County, which is two hours north of Santa Fe (the oldest State Capital in the USA. Also the highest elevation.
    Short answer "yes". Bueno Bye
     
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  10. WadeTyhon

    WadeTyhon Well-Known Member

    Price often equates charge speed. :) For instance, if a 3.3 kW EVSE recharges at a rate of 12 miles an hour, a 6.6 kW charger will recharge ~24 miles an hour.

    However, if you have a gen 1 Volt, you will never be able to charge it at a rate faster than 3.3 kW.

    Some people would suggest future proofing by getting a 6.6 or 7.2 kW L2 charger. If you plan to get a long range BEV within a few years, then ‘future proofing’ may be smart.

    But if you plan to drive your Volt for a while, I would suggest getting a basic clipper creek 3.3 kW EVSE. It will charge your Volt in ~4 hours.

    https://store.clippercreek.com/leve...MIr8O13crg1wIVkrfACh3_wApyEAQYAiABEgJ7PvD_BwE
     
  11. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Greetings Wade:
    Thanks for the information. Now I only need to find out if my 2014 is a gen one. And to see if I need anything else. Gracias, Bueno Bye
     
  12. WadeTyhon

    WadeTyhon Well-Known Member

    You have a gen 1 Volt. :) Gen 1 is from 2010-2015. It charges at the 3.3kW rate.

    Gen2 is from 2016 on. It charges at a 3.6 kW rate.

    The charger I suggested is 3.8 kW apparantly. (I thought it was 3.3) So it is perfectly suited for either Volt generation.
     
  13. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Domenick & Wade
    I selected a Clipper Creek LSC-20 at $379. What do you think? As always. Bueno Bye
     
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  14. NbyNW

    NbyNW New Member

  15. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    I know Clipper Creek has long been one of the top choices, and that price strikes me as pretty good, actually. Make sure you get a qualified electrician to install it.
     
  16. NbyNW

    NbyNW New Member

    I was surprised about the price. Good deal.
     
  17. Domenick

    Domenick Administrator Staff Member

    This is the 16 amp version. I see the 32 amp one is $579 on Amazon, which is more in line with my expectations.
     
  18. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Domenick. I plead by my igorance, how is 32 better than 26 amp. I guess I really should change my name to Jon Snow. But I will still speak Spanglish. Bueno Bye
     
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  19. Francisco

    Francisco Member

    Sorry - 16 not 26
     
  20. WadeTyhon

    WadeTyhon Well-Known Member

    A 32 amp (6.6 kW) charger would usually allow you to basically charge at twice the speed of 16 amp (3.8 kW in this case). Basically what I had advised you on before. :)

    If you plan to get a long range BEV in the near future then the 6.6 kW charger is totally worth the extra money.

    But neither version of the volt can charge at the faster charge speeds of the 32 amp charger.

    If you plan to keep your volt for several years (or you always plan to have a PHEV rather than a long range BEV like a Bolt or the new Leaf) then just stick with the 16 amp / 3.8 kW charger. :)
     
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