Leaf vs Tesla 3 driver aids

Discussion in 'LEAF' started by JJ2, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. JJ2

    JJ2 New Member

    I see a lot of people liking the Tesla 3. Personally, I think the $35k model is a myth. I'm buying a new Leaf for Pro Drive. To get that included on the T3 moves you into the $65k bracket. No thanks! They say the $45k model is a better deal. And the prices just go up from there.
    But my wife just wants a commuter car. She loves her 2015!
     
  2. Kenneth Bokor

    Kenneth Bokor Member

    Hello, it's hard to compare the two systems since Pro Pilot is Level 2/3 with a single camera and forward-directional radar that provides Intelligent Cruise Control and Steering Assist technologies to maintain set spacing from the vehicle in front of you while keeping you in your lane. PP also will use the brakes and regen to stop the car and hold it (if e-pedal is on) and then continue moving forward if the traffic starts moving within 3 seconds. Otherwise you press the accelerator down to start it again or the ok button on the steering wheel. I did a decent video on my YouTube Channel EV Revolution Show - just look for the Pro Pilot Overview episode to see how it works. And it actually works really good, for what it is.

    However as I said, this and Tesla's systems are much different as Tesla has several cameras, radar and sensors to do much more than just provide ICC and SA functions. AutoPIlot is a good Level 3/4 system and keeps getting better thru OTA updates. For the pricing difference, that is what you pay for in the Tesla and it is well worth the money, if you need any automation beyond AEB and Cruise Control.

    I too am hopeful the $35K SR trim of the Model 3 will be shipping soon and don't believe it is a myth, however have voiced my opinion that I am disappointed that Tesla has taken this long and still are not delivering on it.

    If you are comparing the Model 3 and the Leaf Plus, they are different vehicles at what can be had for a similar price point, depending on trims. There is no denying that Tesla has the best battery system on the planet right now and a great Super Charging Network. However, many people simply don't like Tesla for whatever reason and Nissan is one of a growing many that can offer a choice in the Leaf and more models coming over the next several years. I love my 40kWh 2018 Leaf and yes, sometimes wish I had a bigger battery pack for the occasional long trips that I need to take using my wife's ICE car. However, for 90+% of my daily driving needs. the 40kWh Leaf works just fine.

    If you like a sedan and Tesla, and have the money, then the Model 3 is a sure bet. However, if it's something else, then the Leaf is a great vehicle despite the naysayers that complain about Nissan's battery systems. Sure they are not as good as Tesla, no denying, however for normal everyday driving and mainly L1/L2 charging, the Leaf will hold up very nicely.

    Hope this helps.
     
    KENNY likes this.
  3. JJ2

    JJ2 New Member

    Thanks for the information. For us, my wife likes a hatchback. And no way am I paying $65k for an EV. The technology changes too fast. Has there ever been an era like this? I thought it was risky enough to get the 2015 Leaf. I had no idea how long the battery would last. Now, I feel confident in that. I think...
    As for the 'myth' remark - I've read it's not a good package, and most will buy the $42k model. Time will tell. I assume the Tesla is a much better car. I'd pay $42 for one - but not another $22k for auto pilot. I'm not totally brain dead, yet!
    All my wife wants is a commuter car. She loves her car, and I hate to sell it this soon. But we've talked ourselves into the driver aids. We have yet to try any of them out. But I'm 70, and could use a copilot... Especially at night. The question - will that 3rd hand be too much of a nag?
     
    Kenneth Bokor likes this.
  4. DJP

    DJP New Member

    Being in the same age range as JJ2, I really like using the ProPilot when travelling, especially at night. What I find odd is that it sometimes vibrates the steering wheel when it has itself steered the car to cross one of the lines on the road.
     

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